How To Buy A Quality Cheap Used Super exotic sports cars Without Bringing Considered?

April 8, 2009

In many cases the best value in relation to money spent is to buy something that has been previously owned, this is demonstrated well in the automotive industry and especially with Super exotic sports cars. There are many people who would love to own a high performance vehicle just for the thrill of the driving experience that they offer but maybe cannot afford the price of owning a new one. When you look at the cost of a new sports car in addition to the high cost of insurance it can be extremely expensive.

Many times a car enthusiast may go shopping for a used cars for sale by owner or exotic sports cars while having a brand new one in mind. The main thing with buying used cars is to get the best performing and highest quality Cheap cars you can get for the investment you have. This is why you want to identify your wants and needs before you begin the shopping process.

In order to be sure that you don’t spend too much you need to set a budget beforehand as well. Do your research by browsing auto trader type magazines as well as looking at internet sites such as eBay Motors to get an idea of what cars like you have in mind are going for currently.

With an exotic sports cars, perhaps more than any other type of vehicle, it is crucial that you examine the vehicle thoroughly to be sure that it has been well maintained and that it has not been abused. The four main areas to concentrate on are the body, interior, the engine, and the maintenance records.

First off you want to open the hood and take a look at the overall condition of the engine compartment as well as checking the fluids. You don’t have to be a rocket scientist, heck you don’t even have to be mechanically inclined to be able to look over the area and do some basic fluid checks. You also want to check the inside of the tailpipe for any signs of grease or excessive moisture. Grease can indicate a compression problem.

Do a careful walk around the car checking for dents, scratches and obvious overspread that indicates repainting that could mean the vehicle has been wrecked. Pay attention to rubber strips and molding as well as the inside of the fuel filler door area. Lastly, you will definitely want to drive the car before you make any kind of offer. You can’t tell anything about the performance or find out if there are any problems such as alignment without a test drive. If you take your time and you are careful and patient you can get a really good deal by purchasing an exotic sports cars over a new one and possible get the car of your dreams.

Article Source:- How To Buy A Quality Used Sports Car Without Getting Taken


Considered First When Buying Used Cars for Sale by Owners

April 7, 2009

If you are in the market for a car, used cars for sale by owner is a good option for finding the car that you are seeking. Used cars last longer these days and hold their value longer than ever before. With the warranties that are available today, you can get a car that is a few years old that still has a long time left on the warranty. Some people don’t like buying cars for sale by owner because they think the cars have not only been used, but also abused. Of course, the condition of the vehicle will be of concern. In order to assess a used car search, first learn how long it’s been around. Make sure a car’s price reflects its age. For proof of how many times a car has been around the block, investigate its papers.

Tips Considered First When Buying Used Cars for Sale by Owners?

When buying used cars being sold by an owner, it is very important to remember that you are buying the car exactly as you see it, meaning whatever problems the car has, upon buying it, become your problems. Rarely does one sell his/her car unless there is something wrong with it and they are buying a new one. Will you be even getting an honest answer when you ask the owner if the car needs extensive repairs or if the car has been giving the owner frequent problems entailing a huge amount of money in repairing and maintaining the vehicle. Still, there may still be a chance of acquiring a car which has been well maintained from owners who are simply looking for a newer vehicle.

Owners who sell their used cars prices based on car dealerships’ prices on comparable vehicles although sometimes, they may even ask for a higher price compared to counterparts being sold in car dealerships. Owners may demand for a higher price since they assure the customer that they really took proper care of the vehicle. However, you have to remember that very little chance of getting another car from the private owner exists, thus, they really do not put much emphasis on customer satisfaction the same way car dealerships do.

Owners who sell their cars eventually realize that selling their car ‘as is’ may be harder than they have first perceived it to be. Hence, they end up adding more features or making the car even more appealing to choosy buyers. Improving the car would further result to added costs passed on to consumers.

Considering all these factors, it might be even more expensive to buy used cars from owners rather than getting them from respectable car dealers. The cost alone of refurbishing the vehicle may prove costly for the buyer. Finally, make sure that both you and the owner are satisfied with the price and that your agreement is well communicated. Don’t be afraid to ask for clarifications; it is important to know exactly what you’re getting into.


Its Muscle Car Glory Faded, Pontiac Shrivels Up

April 2, 2009

pontiac-muscle-cars

Pontiac models, clockwise from top left: a 1968 GTO, a 1970 Firebird Trans Am, a 2005 GTO and a 2001 Aztek GT. The earlier models had far more fans.

With its history of building muscle cars like the GTO and the low-slung Firebird, Pontiac had good reason to take pride in its best-known marketing slogan from the 1980s, “We Build Excitement.”

Lately it has been using “Pontiac is CAR,” a phrase more likely to catch the attention of grammarians than car buffs.

And on Tuesday, when General Motors asked the federal government for more bailout money, it also announced a reorganization plan that included demoting Pontiac to a “focused niche brand,” signaling that its lineup of vehicles would shrink and that it would no longer be a separate division.

To industry analysts and Pontiac’s longtime fans, the downgrade provides a case study of the product missteps that helped put G.M. in its precarious state, and a reminder of the dangers in straying from a successful formula.

“When you deviate too far from it, that’s when you run into trouble as a brand and a company,” said Jack R. Nerad, executive editorial director at Kelley Blue Book, whose 1968 Firebird made him feel “as cool as I could be.”

More than any other G.M. brand, Pontiac stood for performance, speed and sex appeal. Its crosstown rivals followed with similar muscle cars, giving Detroit bragging rights over the cars that Japanese automakers were selling based on quality and reliability.

Though still G.M.’s third-best-selling division, behind Chevrolet and GMC, Pontiac’s sales peaked in 1984, when it sold almost 850,000 vehicles, roughly four times as many as it sold last year.

G.M.’s chief executive, Rick Wagoner, said the company’s decision to concentrate primarily on Cadillac, Chevrolet, Buick and GMC left the company with a “comprehensive portfolio.”

By many accounts, Pontiac started to falter when G.M. pursued a cost-saving strategy of providing the same cars to different divisions.

It gave Pontiac vehicles like the TransSport minivan, and the Sunbird, Sunfire and Phoenix cars that were barely distinguishable from models sold by Chevrolet and Oldsmobile.

Pontiac also garnered unwanted publicity in 2001 with the Aztek, whose tag line declared, “Quite possibly the most versatile vehicle on the planet.” Its bulky looks landed it on lists of the world’s ugliest cars. Indeed, Aztek won top honors in that category from The Daily Telegraph of London last year.

Pontiac’s current plight is reflected in its Vibe, a well-regarded crossover vehicle that shares underpinnings with the Toyota Matrix, as part of a joint venture between Toyota and G.M.

While the Matrix holds 67 percent of its resale value after three years, according to Kelley Blue Book, the Vibe retains just 54 percent.

The Vibe, whose future is not clear but which was redesigned for 2009, is meant to appeal to the same age group that Pontiac’s muscle cars once did.

But many younger Americans, who were not around for Pontiac’s prime period, will not miss the brand as it shrinks, said Ron Pinelli, who is president of Motorintelligence.com, a company that tracks industry statistics.

To them, he said, “it doesn’t have any cachet unless they’re watching a late-night movie with Burt Reynolds,” whose film “Smokey and the Bandit” featured the Pontiac Trans Am.

But in its best years, Pontiacs were “highly styled and valued and really something,” Mr. Pinelli said.

Known before World War II primarily for its sedate sedans, Pontiac got a lift in the 1950s when G.M. used its cars on the racing circuit. Because of its “wide track” stance, Pontiacs quickly caught on with street racers, as well.

Tim Sampson, whose family owned a yellow Pontiac Grand Prix in the 1960s, remembered the Pontiacs that were used for drag races on President’s Island, in an industrial part of Memphis. “People used to get arrested,” said Mr. Sampson, a founder of the Stax Museum of American Soul.

Italian sports cars inspired another classic Pontiac in the 1960s, when the division’s new general manager, John Z. DeLorean, decided it needed a small, fast car modeled after a Ferrari. He hit on the name GTO — after a Ferrari coupe called the Gran Turismo Omologato.

The GTO returned this decade, as part of an effort to revive Pontiac. But G.M.’s Holden division in Australia built that car.

Its appearance barely echoed the original GTO, disappointing its core audience. It lasted only from 2004 to 2006, before G.M. stopped selling them.

The most recent efforts to breathe new life into Pontiac were put into motion by G.M.’s vice chairman, Robert A. Lutz, who will retire at the end of 2009. Known in the industry for his love of high-performance vehicles, Mr. Lutz had pushed the division to return to its car heritage.

On its Web site, Pontiac explains its new slogan more fully: “Pontiac is style. Pontiac is performance. Pontiac is culture. Pontiac is music. Pontiac is CAR.”

Now, G.M. will have to determine which Pontiacs will remain Pontiacs. So far, Mr. Wagoner and other executives have not given any indication of the company’s specific plans for Pontiac.

But unlike Saturn, which will be discontinued by 2012, G.M. does not have to dismantle a dealership lineup for Pontiac. Its franchises, for the most part, already have been grouped with Buick and GMC. Any future models, G.M. said this week, will be sold through this Buick-Pontiac-GMC organization.

“We’re the third generation, and we’re the last,” said Rick Zimmerman, whose family has sold Pontiacs in Pittsfield, Ill., since the brand came to life as part of its Oakland division in the 1920s. (Pontiac became a stand-alone division in 1932.)

Mr. Zimmerman, whose first car was a GTO, said hundreds of customers used to flood his showroom each fall when new Pontiacs — like the popular Bonneville, now a retired nameplate — were unveiled.

Now, despite positive reviews about the performance of some new models like the G8, he has trouble getting his customers interested in them.

“It’s been a good name, and had a lot of good cars,” Mr. Zimmerman said. “It’s tough to see it go.”